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The Space Review June 28th, 2010

Charles Rector's Weblog; Jun. 30, 2010; By Charles Rector
Type: Commentary

Welcome to this week's issue of The Space Review:


Picking up the torch vs. dropping the ball
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Have recent achievements demonstrated that the development of space launch systems is now within the realm of individual investors? Dwayne Day criticizes a recent analysis that tried to make that case.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1655/1

An embarrassment of riches
---
It sounds like the perfect definition of "swords into plowshares": converting ICBMs into satellite launch vehicles. Wayne Eleazer discusses the controversy proposals to do so have generated in the US launch industry over the years.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1654/1

An Intrepid quest for a shuttle in New York
---
Among the sites seeking one of NASA's space shuttles upon their retirement is New York's Intrepid museum. Jeff Foust examines how the museum stacks up against the competition and whether a shuttle would be good fit in the Big Apple.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1653/1

Space leaders support commercial crew to ISS and accelerated human exploration beyond
---
Last week a diverse group of space industry leaders released a joint letter supporting key elements of NASA's proposed new direction. Alan Stern provides some background about the letter as well as the letter itself.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1652/1

The diary of Juhzoh Okita, exobiologist
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Earlier this month the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa returned to Earth with a capsule scientists hope contains samples of an asteroid. Dwayne Day engages in a bit of fictional speculation about the contents of that capsule.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1651/1


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If you missed it, here's what we published in our previous issue:


Making the path for human spaceflight less rocky
---
The administration's new plan for NASA had led to a debate about destinations, in particular the Moon versus near Earth objects. Dan Lester argues that the real issues revolve around the development of human spaceflight capabilities and the meaning of "space exploration".
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1650/1

SpaceShipOne, government one?
---
Six years ago today SpaceShipOne made history by being the first commercial manned vehicle to fly into space, a milestone seized by many as a triumph for the private sector over the government. Jeff Foust discusses why, today, the public and private sectors need to cooperate, not compete, in this aspect of spaceflight.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1649/1

Individuals pick up the space development torch
---
The achievement of Elon Musk's SpaceX launching Falcon 9 outshines recent efforts by Korea, India, and the United States. Sam Dinkin analyses the implications of this transition.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1648/1

Review: Live TV From the Moon
---
Today we take live video coverage of space missions for granted, but in the 1960s such TV coverage was a challenge for more than technical reasons. Jeff Foust reviews a book that examines the effort to take live television to the Moon with the Apollo missions.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1647/1


We appreciate any feedback you may have about these articles as well as
any other questions, comments, or suggestions about The Space Review.
We're also actively soliciting articles to publish in future issues, so
if you have an article or article idea that you think would be of
interest, please email me.

Until next week,

Jeff Foust
Editor, The Space Review
jeff@thespacereview.com

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